boton_solo.jpg
boton_menor.jpg
boton_grupal3.jpg
boton_grupal3.jpg
boton_menor.jpg
boton_solo.jpg
boton_solo.jpg
boton_menor.jpg
boton_grupal3.jpg
boton_menor.jpg
boton_menor.jpg
boton_solo.jpg
boton_grupal3.jpg
boton_menor.jpg

Point

If we think about life and its various expressions within nature, we cannot help but think about the origin, the beginning of everything, where matter and energy were crammed together in a single extremely tiny point. Even if it is hard to imagine, up to now, it is the scientific theoretical model which best fits most observational evidence, such as expansion of the universe or cosmic background radiation. Science generally accepts this Big Bang theory as the beginning of everything: it was around 13.8 billion years ago when a major explosion expelled matter in all directions, and time started running in a universe which is still expanding. Therefore, it would be contradictory to currently ask oneself where the matter was before since, by definition, the Big Bang constitutes the beginning of space and time. Thus, it would seem that the universe evolved independently of what there was before. And it was/is during this evolution, as from 13.8 billon years up to now, that atoms, molecules, galaxies, stars, and planets have been generated. Out of the billion planets contained by the Universe (clear and definite evidence that universal evolution created life), we live on our planet Earth.

 

Life

Considering its importance, when we think about the concept of life, we note that important scientists cannot agree on a single definition. We note Christian De Duve (Nobel Prize in Medicine, 1974) stating that “life is imbalance”; Carl Sagan, astrophysicist, claiming that “life is a region where the order is increased in cycles moved by energy flow”. As for Robert Shapiro (biochemist), life is “a zone separated from the environment, which includes an energy source, adapts to the environment and evolves, and which is able to reproduce itself”. Chris Mc Kay (astrobiologist) mentions that “life is information and replicable DNA, sheltered by a membrane”. Leslie Orgel (biochemist) states that “life is a complex object which contains information, reproduces itself and evolves by natural selection”. In addition, Francis Crick (biochemist, Nobel Prize 1962 for discovering the DNA) states that “as complex as it is, life is almost a miracle”.

Scientists do not currently agree on the moment life begun, how it begun, and how it representation was, i.e. living beings. Planet Earth is 4.5 billion years old, and the first living beings appeared 3.5 billion years ago. We accept the idea that life originated in fairly shallow sea waters as from inanimate matter, which is called ‘chemical evolution’, with biomolecule drops with proteins, carbohydrates, pH and temperature. The first unicellular organisms called ‘prokaryotes’ arose from the aforementioned evolution. This is how biological evolution started, and it lead to a huge number of forms which arose in an attempt to adapt to the environment. As from 3.5 billion years up to now, some have succeeded and some have not.

 

Living beings and systems

The aforementioned representative forms of life are living beings. In principle, science defines them as a system which is an entity (with an extension limited in space and time) formed by organized parts (components thereof) which interact with each other in order to achieve a common purpose. This is a perfect example to define the axiom which states that “the whole is greater than the sum of the parts”, i.e. the properties of the whole, with no contradiction whatsoever, cannot be completely deduced from the properties of the parts. Such properties are called ‘emerging properties’. Life can be considered as an emergent property in the increasing complexity of matter. Living beings have regulation mechanisms and interact with the environment in order to keep their functional and structural integrity. The metabolism of a living unit is made up of all the relations which take place in it. For the purposes of regulating these internal reactions and generating more living units, these organisms use special molecules which contain specific information.

From the functional point of view, living beings interchange matter and energy with other systems (living systems and other elements) around them. All these things –functional and structural integrity, metabolism, with specific information inside the cells to give similar descendants, and interchanging matter and energy with those around them- define a living being.

 

Virus

But when we think of a virus, there is a grey area in science and there are different school of thoughts, as scientists cannot agree on whether it is an organism or a complex macromolecule, direct descendant of that first chemical evolution, outside the biological evolution. But, in broad terms… what is a virus? Viruses are considered the limit between cells and molecules. In principle, they have a major range of very different forms, sizes, and structures, but they all share certain common properties such as the tiny size (they even are much smaller than prokaryotic cells, those which science claims to be the first living organisms 3.5 billion years ago). We need 23 billion viruses crammed together to be able to see them with the naked eye.

In addition, viruses can only reproduce themselves inside a host cell, using its energy, and turning detrimental to other living beings. They could be compared with simple toxic substances, such as arsenic or insecticides, but they have a major and clear difference: viruses can reproduce themselves, they can make a thousand copies of themselves. In addition, a major difference between viruses and cells is that the latter can reproduce by themselves and viruses cannot, as they need a cell to be able to reproduce themselves. They can be considered biological material systems, independent cellular fragments. Outside a cell, viruses exist as particles, as supra-macromolecular organizations, with no cytoplasm, but with the presence of hereditary information (i.e. viruses contain tiny quantities of genetic material which, depending on the virus, it can be single-stranded or double-stranded DNA or RNA).

It can be remarked that some viruses contain very few different genes. The fewer number of genes, the more the virus will depend on enzymes and other proteins encoded by the genes of its host cell. Genetic material is surrounded by a protein coat, generally formed by a specific number of subunits. In some cases, the parasitized cell is never destroyed, and it is permanently creating new viruses, which are released through the cell membrane. In this way, during the life of the cell, viruses will be released, infecting other healthy cells.

There is a great variety of viruses, and therefore there is also a great variety of organisms hosting these viruses, ranging from bacteria -which are attacked by bacteriophage viruses- and plants -attacked by plant viruses- to animals; the most well-known are those affecting cattle (due to the major damage they cause), such as the foot-and-mouth disease. When it comes to humans, viruses are those causing the flue, colds, mumps, tonsillitis, intestinal discomfort, and temporary headaches with no serious consequences… However, there are also extremely dangerous viruses, such as HIV, Ebola, variola (smallpox), hemorrhagic fever, parotiditis, hepatitis, measles, or canine hydrophobia. They can even create bacteria which, by themselves, do not harm humans, but are detrimental to health when they are joined together (e.g. cholera). Many of them are controlled with vaccines; however, yet some of them are not. Organisms such as plants and animals have developed internal defense systems: white blood cells, which attack invading viruses, producing antibodies which block those viruses. As for vaccines, they stimulate the production of natural antibodies, thus enhancing the defensive capacity of the organism.

 

Passage

It was not until the late 1800s that viruses and bacteria were found to be different things; more precisely in 1892, by Russian scientist Iwanosky. In 1901, the first human virus was discovered: the yellow fever virus; and in 1909, the poliomyelitis virus was discovered. As from 1931, when the first electron microscope was invented, viruses can be observed, i.e. 40 years after they were discovered. This originated a brand new scientific school of thought: virology.

 

Cinco reinos

It should be noted that viruses have not been included within the five kingdoms of nature. The virus which is on everyone’s lips in 2020 is COVID19. Coronaviruses (CoV) constitute a wide group of zoonotic viruses, i.e. they can jump from a non-human animal to humans. They are spherical viruses (about 100-160 nm in diameter) and they have a covering, the genome of which is formed by a single-stranded RNA. In general terms, coronaviruses replication starts with the entrance of virions –infectious form of the virus- when they lose their covering and they deposit their viral RNA in the cytoplasm of the eukaryotic cell, where the similarity with the host’s mRNA allows it to be attached directly to ribosomes for translation thereof. Then, it is used as a template for translation purposes. Using electron microscopy, virions are recognized by a tiny “crown” on their surface, and that is the reason why they are called “coronaviruses”.

Up to now (2020), the most known human coronavirus has been the SARS-CoV, a virus which infects both the upper and lower respiratory tracts, and which it was first identified by the end of February 2003, after the Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS) 1, which started in 2002 in Asia. It then caused an epidemic wave in which more than 8,000 people were infected. Around the 20-30% of the patients required mechanical ventilation, and the death rate was about 10% (the figure was greater in case of elderly people and people with comorbidities), which made the World Health Organization (WHO) issue a global sanitary alert.

The current disease outbreak caused by the new coronavirus COVID-19 was originated in China’s city ‘Wuhan’, a metropolis with a population of 11 million people in the Province of Hubei, where the local authorities first claimed that the origin of the outbreak was unknown, but that it was later connected to a major ‘wet market’ of live animals and seafood in the aforementioned city. The first information –received by the WHO’s office in China regarding a series of 27 cases of pneumonia “of unknown etiology”- was received on December 31, 2019, and the virus at issue was identified as the cause on January 7, 2020. Preliminary analysis suggested a certain homology in amino acids in relation to SARS-CoV, and that it belonged to the genus Betacoronavirus, with structural and phylogenetic relation (79% homology) to the aforementioned SARS-CoV. Despite everything, during February and March, the epidemic spread rapidly, with a dramatic increase in the number of cases and deaths as a result of the disease, and with major local transmission confirmed in many countries of Europe and other continents, which led the WHO to label the disease caused by the new coronavirus as a pandemic on March 11, 2020.

 

 

Punto

Si reflexionamos sobre la vida y sus distintas demostraciones en la naturaleza, no podemos dejar de pensar en el origen, en el inicio del todo, en donde la materia y energía estuvieron contenidas en un pequeñísimo punto. Aunque sea difícil de imaginar, por el momento es el modelo teórico científico que mejor se ajusta a muchas evidencias observacionales, como la expansión del universo o la radiación de fondo cósmico. La ciencia en general acepta esta teoría del Big Bang como el inicio del todo: fue hace unos 13.800 millones de años, cuando una gran explosión lanzó en todas las direcciones a la materia y puso a andar el tiempo, en un universo que aún hoy continúa expandiéndose. Por eso actualmente sería contradictorio preguntarse dónde estaba antes la materia, porque por definición, el Big Bang es el comienzo del espacio y del tiempo. Así, pareciera ser que el universo evolucionó independientemente de lo que había antes. Y fue/es durante esta evolución, desde hace 13.800 millones de años hasta el presente, cuando se han generado los átomos, moléculas, galaxias, estrellas y planetas. De los miles de millones de planetas que contiene el Universo (evidencia clara y concreta de que la evolución universal ha generado vida) nosotros vivimos en nuestro planeta Tierra.

 

Vida

Cuando pensamos en el concepto de la vida, observamos que importantes científicos no han logrado ponerse de acuerdo en una definición única, dada su complejidad. Observamos a Christian De Duve, (Premio Nobel de Medicina de 1974), comentando que “la Vida es desequilibrio”; a Carl Sagan, astrofísico, sostniendo que “la vida es una región donde se incrementa el orden en ciclos movidos por un flujo de energía”. Robert Shapiro (bioquímico) por su parte dice que la vida se trata de “una zona separada del medio, que incluya una fuente de energía, que se adapte al medio y evolucione, y que sea capaz de reproducirse”. Chris Mc Kay (astrobiólogo) comenta que “la vida es información y ADN replicable, al abrigo de una membrana”. Leslie Orgel (bioquímico) detalla por su parte que “la vida es un objeto complejo que contiene información, se reproduce y evoluciona por selección natural”. Por otro lado Francis Crick (bioquímico, Premio Nobel de 1962 por descubrir el ADN) explica que “por lo complicada que es, la vida significa casi un milagro”.

Los científicos en la actualidad no coinciden sobre en qué momento surgió la vida, de qué manera y como era su representación, es decir, los seres vivos. El planeta Tierra tiene 4500 millones años y los primeros seres vivos surgieron hace 3500 millones de años. Se acepta la idea que la vida se origina en el agua de mares de escasa profundidad a partir de materia inanimada, lo que se llama la evolución química, dando gotitas de biomoléculas con proteínas, carbohidratos, PH y temperatura. A partir de esa evolución surgen los primeros seres vivos unicelulares llamados procariotas. Es el comienzo de la evolución biológica, que dio como resultado a la infinidad de formas que han surgido intentando adaptarse al medio cambiante. Algunos lo han logrado y otros no, desde hace 3500 millones hasta el presente.

 

Seres vivos y sistemas

Esas formas representativas de la vida mencionadas anteriormente son los seres vivos: la ciencia los define en principio como un sistema que es una entidad (con una extensión limitada en espacio y tiempo) formada por partes organizadas (sus componentes) que interactúan entre sí para lograr un objetivo en común. Es uno de los ejemplos perfectos para definir el axioma que dice “El todo es más que suma de las partes”, es decir, que las propiedades del conjunto, sin contradecirlas, no pueden deducirse por completo de las propiedades de las partes. Tales propiedades se denominan propiedades emergentes. Puede considerarse la vida como una propiedad emergente en la creciente complejidad de la materia. Los seres vivos presentan mecanismos reguladores e interactúan con el medio para mantener su integridad estructural y funcional. Todas las relaciones que ocurren dentro de una unidad viviente particular constituyen su metabolismo. En la regulación de dichas reacciones internas y para la producción de nuevas unidades vivientes, estos organismos emplean moléculas especiales que contienen información específica.

Desde el punto de vista funcional los seres vivos, intercambian materia y energía con los otros sistemas (vivos y otros elementos) que se encuentran en su entorno. Todos estos puntos -integridad estructural y funcional, metabolismo, con información específica dentro de las células para dar descendencia similar y con intercambio de materia y energía con su entorno-, definen a un ser vivo.

 

Virus

Pero cuando pensamos en los virus, en la ciencia aparece una zona gris y diferentes corrientes de pensamiento, dado que los científicos no se ponen de acuerdo si es un ser vivo o una macromolécula compleja, descendiente directo de esa primera evolución química, por fuera de la evolución biológica. ¿Pero qué son los virus, a grandes rasgos...? Se los considera el límite entre las células y las moléculas. En principio, presentan una gran variedad de formas, tamaños y estructuras muy diferentes, pero todos comparten ciertas propiedades comunes como el tamaño muy pequeño (son incluso mucho más pequeños que las células procariotas, aquellas que la ciencia dice que fueron los primeros organismos vivos, hace 3500 millones de años). Se necesitan 23.000 millones de virus amontonados para poder verlos a simple vista.

Tampoco pueden reproducirse a menos que se encuentren dentro de una célula huésped, cuya energía utilizan, convirtiéndose en dañinos para otros seres vivos. Podríamos compararlos con simples sustancias toxicas como el arsénico o los insecticidas, pero tienen una gran y notoria diferencia, y es que los virus pueden reproducirse, hacer miles de copias de sí mismos. Por otra parte, su gran diferencia con las células, es que éstas pueden reproducirse por sí solas y los virus no, ya que necesitan de una célula para poder lograrlo. Se los puede considerar como sistemas materiales biológicos, fragmentos celulares independientes. Fuera de una célula, el virus existe como partícula, con una organización supra macromolecular. Sin citoplasma, pero con información hereditaria presente (es decir, contiene una pequeña cantidad de material genético que, según el virus, puede ser RNA o DNA de cadena simple o doble).

Es notable que algunos virus contienen escasos genes diferentes. Cuanto menor es el número de genes, más depende el virus de las enzimas y de otras proteínas codificadas por los genes de su célula huésped. El material genético está rodeado por una cápsula proteínica, por lo general constituida por un número específico de subunidades. En algunos casos la célula parasitada nunca se destruye y permanentemente está formando virus nuevos que libera a través de la membrana celular de esta manera mientras la célula viva estarán liberando virus que eran a infectar a otras células sanas.

Ante la gran variedad de virus que existen, existen también gran variedad de organismos hospedantes de estos virus, desde las bacterias, que son atacadas por virus bacteriófagos, y las plantas por los Fitovirus, a los animales, donde los más conocidos son los que atacan el ganado por las grandes pérdidas que producen, como el virus de las aftosa. Para el humano, los virus son los causantes de la gripe, los resfríos, las paperas, las anginas, los malestares intestinales, los dolores de cabeza pasajeros sin consecuencias graves… Pero por otro lado, existen virus muy peligrosos como el de VIH, el ébola, la viruela, fiebre hemorrágica, la parotiditis, la hepatitis, el sarampión o la rabia canina. Incluso logran hacer bacterias que, por sí solas, no dañan al humano, y cuando se unen a ellas son perjudícales para la salud (como por ejemplo el cólera). Muchos de ellos son controlados con vacunas; algunos todavía no. Los organismos como plantas y animales han desarrollado sistemas internos de defensa, los glóbulos blancos, que atacan a los virus cuando ingresan, produciendo anticuerpos que bloquean a los virus. Las vacunas por su lado estimulan la formación de los anticuerpos naturales, aumentando así la capacidad defensiva del organismo.

 

Pasaje

Recién a fines del 1800 se descubrió que virus y bacterias no eran la misma cosa, mas específicamente en 1892, por el científico ruso Iwanosky. En 1901 se descubrió el primer virus humano, el de la fiebre amarilla y en 1909 se detectó el de la poliomielitis. A partir de 1931, cuando se inauguró el primer microscopio electrónico, se lograron ver los virus: 40 años después de su descubrimiento. Esto generó una nueva corriente científica: la virología.

 

Cinco reinos

Es de destacar que los virus no han sido incluidos en los cinco reinos de la naturaleza. El virus que está en boca de todos en el 2020 es el COVID19. Los coronavirus (CoV) constituyen un amplio grupo de virus zoonóticos, esto es, pueden transmitirse entre animales y humanos. Se trata de virus esféricos (de 100-160 nm de diámetro) y con envuelta, cuyo genoma está formado por una única cadena de ARN. En líneas generales, los coronavirus inician su replicación con la entrada de los viriones – forma infecciosa del virus– cuando pierden su envoltura y depositan su ARN viral en el citoplasma de la célula eucariota, donde el parecido con el ARNm del hospedador le permite adherirse directamente a los ribosomas para su traducción. Allí, se emplea como plantilla para traducirse. Por microscopía electrónica, los viriones se reconocen por una pequeña “corona” que presentan a su alrededor y que justifica su nombre

Hasta el presente (año 2020) el coronavirus humano más conocido era el SARS-CoV, un virus que infecta el tracto respiratorio tanto en su parte superior como inferior y fue identificado por primera vez a finales de febrero de 2003 tras el brote del Síndrome Respiratorio Agudo y Severo (SARS)1, comenzado el año 2002 en Asia. Provocó entonces una ola epidémica en la que más de 8.000 personas se infectaron. Entre el 20-30% de pacientes requirieron ventilación mecánica y tuvo una mortalidad cercana al 10% (cifra superior en personas ancianas y con comorbilidades), motivando que la Organización Mundial de la Salud (OMS) emitiera una alerta sanitaria global.

El actual brote de la enfermedad por el nuevo coronavirus o COVID-19 surgió en la ciudad china de Wuhan, una metrópolis de 11 millones de habitantes en la provincia de Huwei, en donde las autoridades locales inicialmente refirieron un origen desconocido del brote aunque posteriormente se relacionó con un gran mercado de animales vivos y mariscos de esa ciudad. Las primeras informaciones -recibidas por la oficina de la OMS en China sobre una serie de 27 casos de neumonía “de etiología desconocida”- tuvieron lugar el 31 de diciembre de 2019, identificándose como causa el virus en cuestión el día 7 de enero. Análisis preliminares sugerían cierta homología en aminoácidos respecto al SARS-CoV. Y perteneciente al género de los beta-coronavirus, con parentesco filogenético (homología del 79%) y estructural con el citado SARS-CoV. Pese a todo, durante los meses de febrero y marzo la epidemia se fue propagando rápidamente, con incrementos dramáticos del número de contagios y defunciones por la enfermedad, y con una importante transmisión comunitaria confirmada en numerosos países de Europa y otros continentes, lo que llevó a la OMS a calificar como pandemia la enfermedad provocada por el nuevo coronavirus el 11 de marzo de 2020.

boton_solo.jpg
Horacio Trotta
Argentina

Virus – Vida